• Sarah @ Little Green Tips

Peat Free April

Updated: Apr 11

One of my passions is growing fruit and vegetables. It's a hobby that I find relaxing and rewarding as well as useful when it comes to feeding the family.



You may, or may not, know that it is Peat Free April. This is a campaign to raise awareness of the damage caused by the peat industry to the wildlife that thrives in the natural ecosystem where peat is found. Many peat bogs are designated as SSSI (Sites of Special Scientific Interest) due to their importance to rare varieties of plant life and animal life particularly birds.


For years Peat has been used as a large proponent of garden compost. It is something that I was vaguely aware of however I didn't fully understand the impact of the gardening world on such an important part of our planet Earth until fairly recently. I’m still slightly embarrassed.


Peat is normally classed as a non-renewable natural resource. It is created from areas of boggy plant life that have partially decomposed over hundreds of years therefore it is very slow to renew. Imagine how slowly it would regenerate at about 1mm growth a year.


I made a decision to go peat free last Autumn. I was conscious that it would probably be more expensive but I felt it was important to move away from a product that destroyed such a rare ecosystem. I did a little research into different sources of peat free compost. Dalefoot compost really appeals to me as it is made in the UK using wool and bracken...however the cost was prohibitively expensive.



I then discovered that B&Q sell a very reasonably priced Peat free compost. I wasn’t sure how good it would be as they only sell multipurpose compost. I’ve always used seed compost in the past so had my concerns.


I needn’t have worried! The Peat free compost is lovely, holds water well and I have many very healthy plants all grown from seed. I’ve had no issues with germination or anything else compost related.